ITO Jakuchu (1716-1800), Japan 伊東若冲 雪中錦鶏図

ITO Jakuchu (1716-1800), Japan 伊東若冲 雪中錦鶏図

ITO Jakuchu (1716-1800), Japan 伊藤若冲

ITO Jakuchu (1716-1800), Japan 伊藤若冲

Ito Jakuchu

Ito Jakuchu

ITŌ Jakuchū 伊藤 若冲 (1716-1800) - "Pictures of the Colorful Realm of Living Beings" - 1759

ITŌ Jakuchū 伊藤 若冲 (1716-1800) - "Pictures of the Colorful Realm of Living Beings" - 1759

伊藤若冲 Jakuchu Ito『芦雁図』ろがんず)| "Pictures of the Colorful Realm of Living Beings", 1765, Jakuchu Ito

伊藤若冲 Jakuchu Ito『芦雁図』ろがんず)| "Pictures of the Colorful Realm of Living Beings", 1765, Jakuchu Ito

Saint-Sever Beatus, Saint-Sever, before 1072  Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris, MS lat. 8878, 14⅜ × 11 in. (36.5 28 cm)  Folio 141: Eagle in Flight from The Grand Medieval Bestiary: Animals in Illuminated Manuscripts by Christian Heck and Rémy Cordonnier, published by Abbeville Press, http://www.abbeville.com/bookpage.asp?isbn=9780789211279

Saint-Sever Beatus, Saint-Sever, before 1072 Bibliothèque Nationale de France, Paris, MS lat. 8878, 14⅜ × 11 in. (36.5 28 cm) Folio 141: Eagle in Flight from The Grand Medieval Bestiary: Animals in Illuminated Manuscripts by Christian Heck and Rémy Cordonnier, published by Abbeville Press, http://www.abbeville.com/bookpage.asp?isbn=9780789211279

Mignon. Roman Arthurien, BnF, Fr 95

Mignon. Roman Arthurien, BnF, Fr 95

Karukaya, Japan's first illustrated book, circa 1400

Karukaya, Japan's first illustrated book, circa 1400

The coot is an intelligent bird; unlike other birds it does not fly about, but stays in one place. It eats fish, but does not eat dead bodies. It builds its nest in the middle of water or on a stone surrounded by water. When it sees a storm coming it returns to its nest or dives under the water. Allegory/Moral The coot represents the man who lives according to God's will and remains within the Church, rather than straying down the path of heresy or following worldly pleasures.

The coot is an intelligent bird; unlike other birds it does not fly about, but stays in one place. It eats fish, but does not eat dead bodies. It builds its nest in the middle of water or on a stone surrounded by water. When it sees a storm coming it returns to its nest or dives under the water. Allegory/Moral The coot represents the man who lives according to God's will and remains within the Church, rather than straying down the path of heresy or following worldly pleasures.

Aberdeen Bestiary - owl

Aberdeen Bestiary - owl

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