Pinterest • 世界中のおしゃれアイデアまとめ

Pinterest でおしゃれアイデアをまとめましょう!

found and cherished: NaNoWriMo Survival Guide

Day -13 NaNoWriMo Prep – Creative Writing Tools

Waiting for NaNoWriMo: Making October Count

Waiting for #NaNoWriMo: Making October Count

Free: NaNoWriMo Checklist

NaNoWrimo Checklist

5 NaNoWriMo Tips

"Even if a scene is going really well, I cut myself off so that I always have a place to start the next day." Such a good point.

Day -9 NaNoWriMo Prep - Setting the Stage. Knowing your character’s living, working and playing environment helps you know them better and helps you create a better experience for the reader. Try a Google Maps walking tour of the neighborhood, write their favorite room in the house, write the restaurant where they always take first dates. Get to know the stage your characters move around on. For more, see: http://debmcleod.com/creative-writing-coach/nanowrimo-events/nanowrimo-prep-countdown/

The NaNoWriMo Success Series: Find Your Story in 3 Easy Steps

The key to a productive NaNoWriMo is preparation! Get started here by choosing your story

Day -6 NaNoWriMo Prep – Visual immersion is a fantastic tool for stimulating creative writing. Find pictures of your characters in magazines or on the web. Look for the places of your story. Create a collage or visual storyboard . Create the high points of your story with your pictures. Take notes on scene ideas and props. Keep your collage close during NaNoWriMo. For more on creating a visual storyboard see…

Day -7 NaNoWriMo Prep – Focus your idea with a synopsis, book jacket or logline. A synopsis documents the emotional change in the story. A book jacket shows the hook and the pertinent plot points. A logline boils the story into a one-line description. Hone your idea before you write. For a discussion of all these methods see: http://debmcleod.com/day-7-focus-your-idea/ For a discussion of loglines, see: http://debmcleod.com/creative-writing-coach/nanowrimo-events/nanowrimo-prep-countdown/

Day-2 NaNoWriMo Prep – So what do you know? Research your world before NaNo starts. Let your internal editor look up spelling, idioms, expertise and strange facts about your character’s local or occupation. Use the five W’s to get started. Call an expert. Most people love to help writers. Be aware of the nitpickers who will let you know if you got it wrong. Want some basic research tips check out this blog…