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Ojibwa family - 1880

Ojibwa family - 1880

Ojibwa family - no date

Ojibwa family - no date

Portrait of Oto man, (George) Arkeketah, Head Chief. Part of Siouan (Sioux) and Otoe Tribes.

Portrait of Oto man, (George) Arkeketah, Head Chief. Part of Siouan (Sioux) and Otoe Tribes.

Ojibwe family in front of their home, MHS Photograph Collection ca. 1860

Ojibwe family in front of their home, MHS Photograph Collection ca. 1860

AINU : Russia vintage photos - Flickr photos - photography and time Cape Cod pictures.

AINU : Russia vintage photos - Flickr photos - photography and time Cape Cod pictures.

Ojibwa family – 1890

Ojibwa family – 1890

.“Mogas” (Modern gals), the Japanese flappers. Modern girls (モダンガール modan gaaru) were Japanese women who followed Westernized fashions and lifestyles in the 1920s. These moga were Japan’s equivalent of America’s flappers, India’s kallege ladki, Germany’s neue Frauen, France’s garçonnes, or China’s modeng xiaojie.

.“Mogas” (Modern gals), the Japanese flappers. Modern girls (モダンガール modan gaaru) were Japanese women who followed Westernized fashions and lifestyles in the 1920s. These moga were Japan’s equivalent of America’s flappers, India’s kallege ladki, Germany’s neue Frauen, France’s garçonnes, or China’s modeng xiaojie.

Ojibwe women making birch bark containers

Ojibwe women making birch bark containers

Ojibwa man – 1910

Ojibwa man – 1910

To the Dakota and Ojibwe Indians, life depended on their skills in using the natural resources of the St. Croix River valley. The Ojibwe and Dakota were semi-nomadic people, they moved from camp to camp looking for food. In the early spring they would move to their sugar bush camps to make maple sugar. Throughout the summer they would be gathered into larger fish camps. When the wild rice was ready to harvest in the fall they would gather in ricing camps. During the winter when game for…

To the Dakota and Ojibwe Indians, life depended on their skills in using the natural resources of the St. Croix River valley. The Ojibwe and Dakota were semi-nomadic people, they moved from camp to camp looking for food. In the early spring they would move to their sugar bush camps to make maple sugar. Throughout the summer they would be gathered into larger fish camps. When the wild rice was ready to harvest in the fall they would gather in ricing camps. During the winter when game for…

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