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Incense Burner | Pacific Coast, Guatemala. Maya. 350-500 AD.

Incense Burner | Pacific Coast, Guatemala. Maya. 350-500 AD.

Mayan Sun/Jaguar God Incense Burner, 3rd-6th Century CE (Michael Carlos Museum at Emory Univeristy, Atlanta, GA)

Mayan Sun/Jaguar God Incense Burner, 3rd-6th Century CE (Michael Carlos Museum at Emory Univeristy, Atlanta, GA)

KAWAI Gyokudo (1873-1957), Japan 川合玉堂

KAWAI Gyokudo (1873-1957), Japan 川合玉堂

Zapotec statue in the museum, Monte Alban, Oaxaca, Mexico

Zapotec statue in the museum, Monte Alban, Oaxaca, Mexico

1/ OAXACA - Icono générale: assis en tailleur, mains sur genoux ou portant un vase, coiffe complexe (glyphes, X, calendrier rituel, panaches de plumes, bonnet cônique, en abat-jour) et ornements (pectoraux). Non sexués dans les phases anciennes. Puis ♀ + nbx, apogée ♂ plutôt. ♂: pagnes, tuniques, capes, colerettes. ♀: jupe, cape, kexkemitl. BO: disques. Plusieurs types de masques.

1/ OAXACA - Icono générale: assis en tailleur, mains sur genoux ou portant un vase, coiffe complexe (glyphes, X, calendrier rituel, panaches de plumes, bonnet cônique, en abat-jour) et ornements (pectoraux). Non sexués dans les phases anciennes. Puis ♀ + nbx, apogée ♂ plutôt. ♂: pagnes, tuniques, capes, colerettes. ♀: jupe, cape, kexkemitl. BO: disques. Plusieurs types de masques.

Seated Male Figure with Glyph C Headdress  Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec, Zapotec, 500-600  Tools and Equipment; containers  Ceramic  Diameter: 6 1/2 in. (16.51 cm); 19 1/2 x 12 x 10 1/2 in. (49.53 x 30.48 x 26.67 cm)  LACMA

Seated Male Figure with Glyph C Headdress Mexico, Oaxaca, Zapotec, Zapotec, 500-600 Tools and Equipment; containers Ceramic Diameter: 6 1/2 in. (16.51 cm); 19 1/2 x 12 x 10 1/2 in. (49.53 x 30.48 x 26.67 cm) LACMA

The legend of la Llorona is usually traced back to Aztec folklore and the goddess Cihuacoatl or Coatlicue--creator and destroyer of earth, mother of gods and mortals, the one who gave birth to the moon and stars--who is said  to have appeared shortly prior to the discovery of New Spain by Hernán Cortés, weeping for her lost children, an omen of the fall of the Aztec empire.

Top 10 Earth Goddesses

The legend of la Llorona is usually traced back to Aztec folklore and the goddess Cihuacoatl or Coatlicue--creator and destroyer of earth, mother of gods and mortals, the one who gave birth to the moon and stars--who is said to have appeared shortly prior to the discovery of New Spain by Hernán Cortés, weeping for her lost children, an omen of the fall of the Aztec empire.

ancient mayan sculptures - Поиск в Google

ancient mayan sculptures - Поиск в Google

Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan

Teotihuacan Stone Figure. Circa 400 to 600 AD. Green stone carved figure incised arms at sides, differentiated legs and headband, triangular nose, slit eyes and ear spools. Originally probably was inlaid. This and more ethnographic art for sale on the CuratorsEye.com

Teotihuacan Stone Figure. Circa 400 to 600 AD. Green stone carved figure incised arms at sides, differentiated legs and headband, triangular nose, slit eyes and ear spools. Originally probably was inlaid. This and more ethnographic art for sale on the CuratorsEye.com

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