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Late-Ottoman urban summer street-wear, made in Aleppo or Gaziantep, late 19th c. Exported from there to many urban centers in Anatolia and the Levant. Purchased in Ankara, in 1991. Called 'ferace' or 'bürgü' in Central Anatolia. Made of two large rectangular pieces of fine silk (ca. 110 x 210 cm), sewed together to form a baggy skirt and attached head dress shawl. The silk fabric is locally called 'meydaniye'. (Inv.n° fer003 - Kavak Costume Collection - Antwerpen/Belgium).

Close-up of the traditional festive costume from the Şalpazarı district (70 km west of Trabzon). In the fashion of the late 1980s. Ethnic group: Çepni Türkleri. The embroideries on the dress and on the waistcoat are machine-made, and produced in local workshops. (Kavak Costume Collection - Antwerpen/Belgium).

Late-Ottoman urban street-wear, made in Aleppo or Gaziantep, late 19th c. Exported from there to many urban centers in Anatolia and the Levant. Purchased in Konya, in 1996. Called 'ferace' or 'bürgü' in Central Anatolia. Made of two large rectangular pieces of silk (ca. 110 x 210 cm), sewed together to form a baggy skirt and attached head dress shawl. The silk fabric is locally called 'meydaniye'. (Inv.n° fer002 - Kavak Costume Collection - Antwerpen/Belgium).

Traditional bridal (& festive) costumes of Eskişehir (central district and Seyitgazi). Style: mid-20th century; it is a remainder of the ‘Bahriye’ (Marine) style, which was popular in western Anatolia in the 1920s-1930s. These particular dresses date from 1960-1995; metal thread embroidery (in ‘tuturma’ technique) on silk or velvet. Such costumes are still (hand-)made and used/sold/rented for marriages. (Kavak Folklor Ekibi & Costume Collection-Antwerpen/Belgium).

Large silk head dress shawl. From Syria, c. early 20th century. 180 x 166 cm.

Late-Ottoman street-wear, from Aleppo (northern Syria), early 20th century. Exported from there to many urban centers in Anatolia and the Levant. Made of two large rectangular pieces of silk (ca. 110 x 210 cm), sewed together to form a baggy skirt and a kind of large airy cape. The silk fabric is locally called 'meydaniye'.

A fine Ottoman metal-thread embroidered silk Panel Turkey, late 18th Century/ early 19th Century rectangular, the yellow silk ground embroidered in polychrome silks and metal thread with a repeat design of floral sprays, the borders with an undulating floral vine, mounted

A woman’s festive dress from Niğde (Cappadokia). Early 19th century. Possibly Greek or Armenian, considering the style of the embroideries. Made completely of a bright colour combed wool fabric with contrasting silk cord embroidery.

Major cities and towns along the Silk Road. - Google Search.