Base of Shinsengumi at  the Yagi Residence Mibu Kyoto Japan - next time I go to Japan, I'm there!

Base of Shinsengumi at the Yagi Residence Mibu Kyoto Japan - next time I go to Japan, I'm there!

Hijikata Toshizo, initially one of the vice-captains of the Shinsengumi under Kondo, Serizawa Kamo and Niimi Nishiki. But Serizawa and Niimi abused their status as protectors of Kyoto and tarnished the reputation of the entire Shinsengumi. Hijikata investigated and found enough evidence to convict Niimi, and ordered him to commit seppuku. Then Serizawa and his followers were assassinated by a group of people including Okita, and Kondo became the sole Captain, with Hijikata as his…

Hijikata Toshizo, initially one of the vice-captains of the Shinsengumi under Kondo, Serizawa Kamo and Niimi Nishiki. But Serizawa and Niimi abused their status as protectors of Kyoto and tarnished the reputation of the entire Shinsengumi. Hijikata investigated and found enough evidence to convict Niimi, and ordered him to commit seppuku. Then Serizawa and his followers were assassinated by a group of people including Okita, and Kondo became the sole Captain, with Hijikata as his…

Matsudaira Katamori was a samurai who lived in the last days of the Edo period and the early to mid Meiji period. He was the 9th daimyo of the Aizu han and the Military Commissioner of Kyoto during the Bakumatsu period. During the Boshin War, Katamori and the Aizu han fought against the Meiji Government armies, but were severely defeated. Katamori's life was spared, and he later became the Chief of the Tōshōgū Shrine.

Matsudaira Katamori was a samurai who lived in the last days of the Edo period and the early to mid Meiji period. He was the 9th daimyo of the Aizu han and the Military Commissioner of Kyoto during the Bakumatsu period. During the Boshin War, Katamori and the Aizu han fought against the Meiji Government armies, but were severely defeated. Katamori's life was spared, and he later became the Chief of the Tōshōgū Shrine.

Kondō Isami (1834-1868) commander of the  shinsengumi, a special police force of the late shogunate period  (1863–1868). The shinsengumi policed Kyoto for the Shogun. At its peak, the Shinsengumi had about 300 members. They were the first samurai group of the Tokugawa era to allow those from non-samurai classes like farmers and merchants to join. Previously, Japan had a strict class hierarchy system. Many joined the group due to the desire to become samurai and be involved in political…

Kondō Isami (1834-1868) commander of the shinsengumi, a special police force of the late shogunate period (1863–1868). The shinsengumi policed Kyoto for the Shogun. At its peak, the Shinsengumi had about 300 members. They were the first samurai group of the Tokugawa era to allow those from non-samurai classes like farmers and merchants to join. Previously, Japan had a strict class hierarchy system. Many joined the group due to the desire to become samurai and be involved in political…

Shinsengumi Mibu Basement, Kyoto, Japan

Shinsengumi Mibu Basement, Kyoto, Japan

Matsudaira Katamori (松平 容保?, February 15, 1836−December 5, 1893) was a samurai who lived in the last days of the Edo period and the early to mid Meiji period. He was the 9th daimyo of the Aizu han and the Military Commissioner of Kyoto during the Bakumatsu period. During the Boshin War, Katamori and the Aizu han fought against the Meiji Government armies, but were severely defeated. Katamori's life was spared, and he later became the Chief of the Tōshōgū Shrine.

Matsudaira Katamori (松平 容保?, February 15, 1836−December 5, 1893) was a samurai who lived in the last days of the Edo period and the early to mid Meiji period. He was the 9th daimyo of the Aizu han and the Military Commissioner of Kyoto during the Bakumatsu period. During the Boshin War, Katamori and the Aizu han fought against the Meiji Government armies, but were severely defeated. Katamori's life was spared, and he later became the Chief of the Tōshōgū Shrine.

Japan - Detail of Kyoto's Elite Shinsengumi Samurai Clan from the Bakumatsu Period

Japan - Detail of Kyoto's Elite Shinsengumi Samurai Clan from the Bakumatsu Period

Sakamoto Ryoma (坂本龙马; Kōchi , January 3 1836 - Kyoto , December 10 1867 ) was a samurai Japanese , head of the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu period in Japan.

Sakamoto Ryoma (坂本龙马; Kōchi , January 3 1836 - Kyoto , December 10 1867 ) was a samurai Japanese , head of the movement to overthrow the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu period in Japan.

The Shinsengumi (新選組 or 新撰組, meaning "the new squad") was a special police force organized by the Bakufu (military government) during Japan's Bakumatsu period (late shogun) in 1864. It was active until 1869. It was founded to protect the Shogunate representatives in Kyoto at a time when a controversial imperial edict to exclude foreign trade from Japan had been made and the Choshu clan had been forced from the imperial court. The men were drawn from the sword schools of Edo.

The Shinsengumi (新選組 or 新撰組, meaning "the new squad") was a special police force organized by the Bakufu (military government) during Japan's Bakumatsu period (late shogun) in 1864. It was active until 1869. It was founded to protect the Shogunate representatives in Kyoto at a time when a controversial imperial edict to exclude foreign trade from Japan had been made and the Choshu clan had been forced from the imperial court. The men were drawn from the sword schools of Edo.

Okita Sōji (沖田 総司?), (1842 or 1844 – July 19, 1868) was the captain of the first unit of the Shinsengumi, a special police force in Kyoto during the late shogunate period. He was one of the best swordsmen of the Shinsengumi.

Okita Sōji (沖田 総司?), (1842 or 1844 – July 19, 1868) was the captain of the first unit of the Shinsengumi, a special police force in Kyoto during the late shogunate period. He was one of the best swordsmen of the Shinsengumi.

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