Furisode #284240 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

Furisode #284240 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

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Furisode #285887 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

Furisode #285887 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

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Furisode #285887 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

Furisode #285887 Kimono Flea Market Ichiroya

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Garment of the day: Silver and white silk kimono (uchikake) with heavily brocaded pine tree and cranes in gold, red and black. Japanese, 20th century, KSUM 1983.1.2162

Garment of the day: Silver and white silk kimono (uchikake) with heavily brocaded pine tree and cranes in gold, red and black. Japanese, 20th century, KSUM 1983.1.2162

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thekimonogallery:  Cotton maiwai kimono worn at fishing celebrations. Second quarter 20th century, Japan. MET Museum (Gift of Mrs. John Steel, 1980)

thekimonogallery: Cotton maiwai kimono worn at fishing celebrations. Second quarter 20th century, Japan. MET Museum (Gift of Mrs. John Steel, 1980)

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Taisho Kimono - Taisho era (1912-1926). A high-grade rinzu silk kimono that features large, bold paper-crane motifs throughout. These motifs were created using the yuzen dyeing technique. Gold surihaku (metal leafing) outlining. A single mon (family crest) on the back. 49" from sleeve-end to sleeve-end x 59" height. The Kimono Gallery

Taisho Kimono - Taisho era (1912-1926). A high-grade rinzu silk kimono that features large, bold paper-crane motifs throughout. These motifs were created using the yuzen dyeing technique. Gold surihaku (metal leafing) outlining. A single mon (family crest) on the back. 49" from sleeve-end to sleeve-end x 59" height. The Kimono Gallery

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Kimono

Kimono

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Kimono designs often come from the natural world and have great significance and complex meanings. The crane, for example, is one of the most revered and auspicious animals in Japanese art, representing longevity and good fortune. The crane kimono below, for example, is a wedding kimono created during the Showa period between 1926-1989 (photo courtesy of the Textile Museum).

Kimono designs often come from the natural world and have great significance and complex meanings. The crane, for example, is one of the most revered and auspicious animals in Japanese art, representing longevity and good fortune. The crane kimono below, for example, is a wedding kimono created during the Showa period between 1926-1989 (photo courtesy of the Textile Museum).

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Furisode

Furisode

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Uchikake

Uchikake

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