Francis the Encyclopaedist

Francis the Encyclopaedist

Francis the Encyclopaedist - YouTube

Francis the Encyclopaedist - YouTube

Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – c. 50 AD) was a Roman encyclopaedist, known for his extant medical work, De Medicina, which is believed to be the only surviving section of a much larger encyclopedia.

Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – c. 50 AD) was a Roman encyclopaedist, known for his extant medical work, De Medicina, which is believed to be the only surviving section of a much larger encyclopedia.

Paracelsus: the Father of Toxicology and the Enemy of Physicians. #history

Paracelsus: the Father of Toxicology and the Enemy of Physicians. #history

N - THE MADNESS OF REASON is the story of an unusual obsession. A French encyclopaedist tries to complete his life's work from beyond death. Hovering between dream and reality, this magical film plays on the confrontation between the Western mind and African spirituality.

N - THE MADNESS OF REASON is the story of an unusual obsession. A French encyclopaedist tries to complete his life's work from beyond death. Hovering between dream and reality, this magical film plays on the confrontation between the Western mind and African spirituality.

Pierre Larousse ♦ French grammarian, lexicographer and encyclopaedist.

Pierre Larousse ♦ French grammarian, lexicographer and encyclopaedist.

Horehound, White Marrubium Vulgare

Horehound, White Marrubium Vulgare

War of the Encyclopaedists by Christopher Robinson

War of the Encyclopaedists by Christopher Robinson

Marrubium vulgare Horehound has been mentioned in conjunction with medicinal use dating at least back to the first century BC, where it appeared as a remedy for respiratory ailments in the treatise De Medicina by Roman encyclopaedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus.[1]

Marrubium vulgare Horehound has been mentioned in conjunction with medicinal use dating at least back to the first century BC, where it appeared as a remedy for respiratory ailments in the treatise De Medicina by Roman encyclopaedist Aulus Cornelius Celsus.[1]

Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – c. 50 AD) was a Roman encyclopaedist, known for his extant medical work, De Medicina. The De Medicina is a primary source on diet, pharmacy, surgery and related fields, and it is one of the best sources concerning medical knowledge in the Roman world. Hippocrates used the Greek word carcinos, meaning crab or crayfish, to refer to malignant tumors. It was Celsus who translated the Greek term into the Latin “CANCER”, also meaning crab.

Aulus Cornelius Celsus (c. 25 BC – c. 50 AD) was a Roman encyclopaedist, known for his extant medical work, De Medicina. The De Medicina is a primary source on diet, pharmacy, surgery and related fields, and it is one of the best sources concerning medical knowledge in the Roman world. Hippocrates used the Greek word carcinos, meaning crab or crayfish, to refer to malignant tumors. It was Celsus who translated the Greek term into the Latin “CANCER”, also meaning crab.

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