Graphic design (via fullbloom > Ginkgo 991 Black) #pattern

Graphic design (via fullbloom > Ginkgo 991 Black) #pattern

“I have drawn things since I was 6. All that I made before the age of 70 is not worth counting. At 75 I began to understand the true construction of nature. At 90 I will enter into the secret of things. At 110, everything--every dot, every dash--will live” - KATSUSHIKA Hokusai (1760-1849), Japan

“I have drawn things since I was 6. All that I made before the age of 70 is not worth counting. At 75 I began to understand the true construction of nature. At 90 I will enter into the secret of things. At 110, everything--every dot, every dash--will live” - KATSUSHIKA Hokusai (1760-1849), Japan

Settai Komura (1887–1940) was a refined yet prolific Shin Hanga artist. As a kabuki stage set designer, he produced around 200 works. He also was an illustrator, painter and designer, ranging from woodblock prints, to posters, to advertising.

Images of a Changing World: Settai Komura (1887–1940)

Settai Komura (1887–1940) was a refined yet prolific Shin Hanga artist. As a kabuki stage set designer, he produced around 200 works. He also was an illustrator, painter and designer, ranging from woodblock prints, to posters, to advertising.

Katsura-rikyu, Katsura Imperial Villa, Kyoto, Japan, 1620-62.  Shoin-style home of Prince Hachijo.

Katsura-rikyu, Katsura Imperial Villa, Kyoto, Japan, 1620-62. Shoin-style home of Prince Hachijo.

RAKU Kichizaemon  Black Raku tea bowl, yakinuki type 2012  Photo: HATAKEYAMA Takashi

RAKU Kichizaemon Black Raku tea bowl, yakinuki type 2012 Photo: HATAKEYAMA Takashi

Christine Fabre |  Raku

Christine Fabre | Raku

Raku teabowl, named Yûgure (Twilight)  by Chôjirô Momoyama period (1573-1615)

Raku teabowl, named Yûgure (Twilight) by Chôjirô Momoyama period (1573-1615)

Settai Komura Love the quietness of his prints.

Images of a Changing World: Settai Komura (1887–1940)

Settai Komura Love the quietness of his prints.

Raku tea bowls originated in Japan in the late 16th Century. Small, austere and often irregular-shaped bowls were made for the purpose of drinking powdered green tea during the Zen Buddhist tea ceremony.

Raku tea bowls originated in Japan in the late 16th Century. Small, austere and often irregular-shaped bowls were made for the purpose of drinking powdered green tea during the Zen Buddhist tea ceremony.

by Settai Komura (1887~1940), Japan

by Settai Komura (1887~1940), Japan

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