Chinthe

A lion-like creature revered both as a Buddhist guardian and as the symbol for success in new endeavors, this bronze Burmese chinthei is an especially imaginative version of the leogryph seen throughout Southeast Asia and India. In Burma, entrances to most Buddhist pagodas and temples are protected by pairs of chinthei. http://www.silkroad1.com/catalog/query.php?keywords=bronze+or+metal+or+or+bell&dealers=thesilkroad&fromtrocadero=1&start=18&l=18&view=list
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( Komainu)Lion-dog statue@Nakano by sisigashira

( Komainu)Lion-dog statue@Nakano by sisigashira

Komainu  often called lion-dogs in English, are statue pairs of lion-like creatures either guarding the entrance or the inner shrine of many Japanese Shinto shrines or kept inside the inner shrine itself, where they are not visible to the public. The first type, born during the Edo period, is called sandō komainu , the second and much older type jinnai komainu. They can sometimes be found also at Buddhist temples, nobility residences or even private homes.

Komainu often called lion-dogs in English, are statue pairs of lion-like creatures either guarding the entrance or the inner shrine of many Japanese Shinto shrines or kept inside the inner shrine itself, where they are not visible to the public. The first type, born during the Edo period, is called sandō komainu , the second and much older type jinnai komainu. They can sometimes be found also at Buddhist temples, nobility residences or even private homes.

Ornamental comb depicting two mythological lions, facing each other, (Chinthe in Burma, or Rajasi in Thailand)  Burma, 19C - early 20C Water buffalo horn carved/incised on both sides, mysterious traces of silver in incised rows (?) red paint on inside and outside edges, beautifully enhancing the whole design.

Ornamental comb depicting two mythological lions, facing each other, (Chinthe in Burma, or Rajasi in Thailand) Burma, 19C - early 20C Water buffalo horn carved/incised on both sides, mysterious traces of silver in incised rows (?) red paint on inside and outside edges, beautifully enhancing the whole design.

Opium Weight 10 tical To / Chinthe 17thC

Opium Weight 10 tical To / Chinthe 17thC

Opium Weights. Before regular currency, transactions in bazaars were made by weighing out lumps of metal called Ganza. Made in the shape of animals, there were three most common ones. The Hanta (duck), Ziwazo (chicken) and To or Chinthe (dog-like). Weights came in approximately 16g, 32g, 80g, 160g, and 320g called Kyats and are made out of dark-tones brass. Location: Burmese | Dimensions: A Range Of Sizes Between 1.5" x .75" x .75" and 3" x 1.75" x 2".

Opium Weights. Before regular currency, transactions in bazaars were made by weighing out lumps of metal called Ganza. Made in the shape of animals, there were three most common ones. The Hanta (duck), Ziwazo (chicken) and To or Chinthe (dog-like). Weights came in approximately 16g, 32g, 80g, 160g, and 320g called Kyats and are made out of dark-tones brass. Location: Burmese | Dimensions: A Range Of Sizes Between 1.5" x .75" x .75" and 3" x 1.75" x 2".

Chinthe Lion, Manuha Temple by Aidan McRae Thomson, via Flickr

Chinthe Lion, Manuha Temple by Aidan McRae Thomson, via Flickr

opium weights | opium weight: Opium Weight 20 tical To / Chinthe 17thC EOW102

opium weights | opium weight: Opium Weight 20 tical To / Chinthe 17thC EOW102

opium weights | Opium Weight: Opium Weight 10 tical To/Chinthe 17thC EOW78

opium weights | Opium Weight: Opium Weight 10 tical To/Chinthe 17thC EOW78

Golden Chinthe, Shwezigon Temple by Aidan McRae Thomson, via Flickr

Golden Chinthe, Shwezigon Temple by Aidan McRae Thomson, via Flickr

carved wooden temple lion

carved wooden temple lion

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